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Mutual Broadcast Payments

Make your payments to Mutual Broadcast easily and securely through Paypal. Once your payment has been processed, we will contact you for details such as organizational information.  We cannot offer consulting services without at least the payment of the retainer.  You can start with just the retainer, which is applied towards the full fee. Services and filing cannot be rendered until full invoice amount has been paid. Alternately you can pay through installment payments by financing through Paypal’s Bill me Later Service.

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Testimonials for Mutual Broadcast!

radiotowerIf Mutual Broadcast has provided satisfactory service to your organization – please let others know – fill out the quick form located here.  Thanks!


“I have had over 10 years experience working with Leo. He has technical and regulatory competence as a leader in the LPFM Community. He assisted KGCA-LP obtain its CP. Leo has a passion for Community Broadcasting. He has focused on how to provide affordable services to broadcasters with limited resources. His dedication and efforts are known to the FCC and the LPFM community from the very beginning of LPFM broadcasting service. I recommend that anyone wanting to obtain an LPFM discuss their project with Leo. I am not aware of anyone with more commitment and expertise in LPFM..” February 27, 2011

Top qualities: Great Results, Expert, Good Value

Robert Kelley,  
hired Leo as a Broadcast Consultant in 2001, and hired Leo more than once


“Leo At Mutual Broadcast can be a great asset to you if you are thinking of starting a new radio station. From LPFM Radio to full power commercial he can handle it all. Mutual is for a friendly, courteous, knowledgeable broadcast engineer , thanks Mike” March 3, 2011

Top qualities: Great Results, Personable, Good Value

Michael Brandt,  
hired Leo as a Radio in 2010


“Leo: Has done a great job everytime for our stations. If you want results then you need to call Leo!” February 23, 2011

Top qualities: Great Results, Expert, High Integrity

Frank Patterson,  
hired Leo as a Broadcasting Eng. in 2001, and hired Leo more than once

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Listening to the Radio like doing Cocaine

radioheadphonessquashed

Well now, this explains a few things.  Always interested in carrying science forward, I read with interest the article on Gawker which cites a study from McGill University in Montreal, Canada.  The gist of the article states that we seek out music we enjoy because of a chemical reaction in our brains:

Ever had goosebumps or felt euphoric chills when listening to a piece of music? If so, your brain is reacting to the music in the same way as it would to some delicious food or a psychoactive drug such as cocaine, according to scientists.

The experience of pleasure is mediated in all these situations by the release of the brain’s reward chemical, dopamine, according to results of experiments carried out by a team led by Valorie Salimpoor of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, which are published today in Nature Neuroscience.

Music seems to tap into the circuitry in the brain that has evolved to drive human motivation – any time we do something our brains want us to do again, dopamine is released into these circuits. “Now we’re showing that this ancient reward system that’s involved in biologically adaptive behaviours is being tapped into by a cognitive reward,” said Salimpoor.

If music-induced emotional states can lead to dopamine release, as our findings indicate, it may begin to explain why musical experiences are so valued. These results further speak to why music can be effectively used in rituals, marketing or film to manipulate hedonistic states. Our findings provide neurochemical evidence that intense emotional responses to music involve ancient reward circuitry and serve as a starting point for more detailed investigations of the biological substrates that underlie abstract forms of pleasure.

By extension, radio has previously been the venue for most new music discovery.  Although this continues today, it is being supplanted by “new media” sources such as youtube.  As a point of reference, studies on cocaine addiction show that dopamine levels increase by about 22% during use.  When a listener is exposed to what is perceived as good music (a subjective term), average dopamine levels increased by about 21%.

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